History of Logos

Clothing brands are a status symbol today. Most clothing companies such as Gap, Calvin Klein etc make the most of putting their logos on any clothing item that they make. Think of all the free advertising you are doing for them. This section describes the origins of some of the popular clothing logos. If you have any information about the history of some these logos, please contact me.


Lacoste Logo - Design and History

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Image  Lacoste is a French apparel company founded in 1933 that sells clothing, footwear, perfume, leather goods, watches, eyewear, and most famously, tennis shirts. The Lacoste company was founded in 1933 and takes its name from Rene Lacoste, the world-renowned tennis player and sports enthusiast. Rene Lacoste did not like the traditional shirts used for tennis and teamed up with Andre Gillier, the owner of France's largest knitwear company, to create the knitted cotton pique shirt that revolutionized the sportswear market.

The American press nicknamed Rene Lacoste the "Crocodile" after he made a bet with the Captain of the French Davis Cup team. He had promised Rene a crocodile skin suitcase if he won a match that was important to the team. The American public stuck with this nickname that highlighted Rene's tenacity on the tennis court. A friend of Rene's, Robert George, drew a crocodile that was embroidered on the blazer that he wore on the court from then on.

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The North Face Logo - Design and History

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The North Face, Inc. is an outdoor product company specializing in high-end outerwear, fleece, footwear, and equipment. The clothing and equipment lines are catered towards climbers, mountaineers, skiers, snowboarders, hikers, and endurance athletes.The clothing line is famous for its use on mountaineering expeditions on Mt. Everest and in other extreme outdoor activities.

The North Face brand was established in 1968, in San Francisco, California, when Douglas Tompkins and Kenneth "Hap" Klopp created an equipment retail store that eventually acquired the current name "The North Face". This name was chosen because the north face of a mountain in the northern hemisphere is generally the steepest, coldest, and most difficult face to climb.

The North Face's easily recognizable logo consists of a slightly skewed quarter-circle with two lines running within it. This image is supposedly an interpretation of the famous Half Dome rock formation in Yosemite National Park. Adjacent to the symbol are the words THE NORTH FACE embroidered in large block letters.

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